Friday, 13 March 2015

A Brief History on UFOs

The UFO defined as "An unidentified flying object; a 'flying saucer'." The first published book to use the word was authored by Donald E. Keyhoe.
The acronym "UFO" was coined by Captain Edward J. Ruppelt, who headed Project Blue Book, then the USAF's official investigation of UFOs. He wrote, "Obviously the term 'flying saucer' is misleading when applied to objects of every conceivable shape and performance. For this reason the military prefers the more general, if less colorful, name: unidentified flying objects. UFO (pronounced Yoo-foe) for short." Other phrases that were used officially and that predate the UFO acronym include "flying flapjack," "flying disc," "unexplained flying discs," "unidentifiable object," and "flying saucer."
The first well-known UFO sighting occurred in 1947, when businessman Kenneth Arnold claimed to see a group of nine high-speed objects near Mount Rainier in Washington while flying his small plane. Arnold estimated the speed of the crescent-shaped objects over 1,200 mph (1,931 km/h) and said they moved “like saucers skipping on water.” In the newspaper report that followed, it was mistakenly stated that the objects were saucer-shaped, hence the term flying saucer.

1948 - Air National Guard fighter Pilot Thomas Mantell dies during attempted intercept of UFO over Kentucky. U.S Air Force establishes "Project Sign" as first long-term, official UFO investigation. Project Sign staff report on Alien origin of UFOs is rejected by USAF chief Hoyt Vandenberg due to lack of physical evidence.

1949- Project Grudge replaces Project Sign. Government conference on rash of large, brilliant green fireballs leads to 1950's Project Twinkle, which allegedly failed to track and photograph any.

1950 - First UFO books published by investigative reporter Keyhoe and Hollywood gossip columnist Frank Scully.

1952 - Project Blue Book replaces Project Grudge. Aerial Phenomenon Research Organization (APRO) becomes first long-term private UFO association.

1956 - National Investigation Committee on Aerial Phenomenon (NICAP) becomes first private UFO group with a Washington office.

1967 - American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) establishes UFO subcommittee. Wesley University offers first credit course on UFOs. Sovet TV announcement reveals short-lived non-government UFO group.

According to some Italian ufologists, the first documented case of a UFO in Italy dates back to April 11, 1933, to Varese. Documents of the time show that an alleged UFO crashed or landed near Vergiate. Following this, Benito Mussolini created a secret group to look at it.
The UK's Flying Saucer Working Party published its final report in June 1951, which remained secret for over 50 years. The Working Party concluded that all UFO sightings could be explained as misidentifications of ordinary objects or phenomena, optical illusions, psychological mis-perceptions/aberrations, or hoaxes. The report stated: "We accordingly recommend very strongly that no further investigation of reported mysterious aerial phenomena be undertaken, unless and until some material evidence becomes available."
Eight file collections on UFO sightings, dating from 1978 to 1987, were first released on May 14, 2008, to The National Archives by the Ministry of Defence (MoD).[70] Although kept secret from the public for many years, most of the files have low levels of classification and none are classified Top Secret. 200 files are set to be made public by 2012.
A secret study of UFOs was undertaken for the Ministry of Defence between 1996 and 2000 and was code-named Project Condign. The resulting report, titled "Unidentified Aerial Phenomena in the UK Defence Region," was publicly released in 2006, but the identity and credentials of whomever constituted Project Condign remains classified. The report confirmed earlier findings that the main causes of UFO sightings are misidentification of man-made and natural objects. The report noted: "No artefacts of unknown or unexplained origin have been reported or handed to the UK authorities, despite thousands of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena reports.
According to records released on August 5, 2010, British wartime prime minister Winston Churchill banned the reporting for 50 years of an alleged UFO incident because of fears it could create mass panic. Reports given to Churchill asserted that the incident involved a Royal Air Force (RAF) reconnaissance aircraft returning from a mission in France or Germany toward the end of World War II. It was over or near the English coastline when it was allegedly intercepted by a strange metallic object that matched the aircraft's course and speed for a time before accelerating away and disappearing. The aircraft's crew were reported to have photographed the object, which they said had "hovered noiselessly" near the aircraft, before moving off.



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